Holiday Celebrations Lead Americans To Consume Twice As Much Booze

NEW YORK — A Christmas party wouldn’t be complete without eggnog and cider, but new research may make you think twice about how much booze you consume for the holiday. A survey of 2,000 Americans finds adults consume twice as many alcoholic beverages during the holidays than any other time of year.

The holiday season, which researchers referred to as the time between Thanksgiving and New Years, is filled with parties and get-togethers for many of us. The survey, commissioned by supplement company Morning Recovery, showed that while the average American attends just one social event in a typical week, during the holidays that number jumps to three. That means plenty to eat — as one survey already discovered — and drink, too.

All that socializing, the survey showed, leads to three hangover-laden rough morning per week during the height of the season. In fact, more than a third (36 percent) admit that all the boozy celebrating actually winds up dampening their holiday spirits. That said, it’s no surprise that respondents found themselves arriving late to work three times over the holidays, and calling out sick twice. Seven out of 10 participants admit the partying, naturally, makes them less productive at work.

And our wallets take a major hit too: the average person blows $537 during the holidays on parties, dinners, drinks, or other social events. That’s far more than the $241 per month Americans spend on socializing typically during the year.

“We weren’t surprised to find that Americans socialize more, drink more, and as a result, suffer from more rough mornings and lost productivity throughout the holiday season,” says Morning Recovery co-founder and CEO Sisun Lee in a statement

As for which holiday drinks were most popular among respondents, of course eggnog tops the list. Coffee with Baileys was second on the list, followed by Christmas beer. Cider and hot buttered rum rounded out the top five.

The survey was conducted by OnePoll in November 2018.

Like studies? Follow us on Facebook!