Drop that Twinkie! Half of Americans hide their favorite snacks from family members

NEW YORK — If you can never find the good snacks at home, it’s likely because you don’t know the secret spot.

A survey of 2,000 American snackers reveals nearly half (48%) have stashed their favorite treats in hidden spots around the house. Many admit they have no plans to share them with the rest of their family.

Forty-six percent of those who have hidden snacks said they simply “don’t want to share,” while 53 percent said the people they live with would “eat them all” if they knew where to look.

Hiding Good Snacks

Conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Stuffed Puffs, researchers discovered, among respondents who admit to hiding snacks, 69 percent say they still do this at home. Over seven in 10 (72%) add their snack stash has been discovered by someone else at some point, pushing the average person to move them four times to try to keep it a secret.

Where to check for hidden ‘snackpiles’

When it comes to who is “guilty” of sniffing out the good eats, it’s actually a tie! Both 71 percent of partners and kids rank as the biggest culprits for discovering respondents’ “snackpiles.”

If snacks are disappearing from the kitchen, places to check include behind the washing machine, inside oatmeal containers, and behind books on a bookshelf. All three are creative places respondents admit they use for storing snacks.

Despite the creative hiding places, researchers also found only six percent of respondents have never been caught snacking. The average respondent believes they could survive almost five full months on their stockpile of tasty treats alone.

“Trust me, as a mom of three, I’ve attempted to hide my favorite snacks too,” says Carla O’ Brien, SVP of Marketing, Stuffed Puffs, in a statement. “We weren’t surprised so many people have a secret hiding spot for their snacks — I get it, no one wants all the good snacks to disappear before eating any.”

 

Two-thirds (66%) said snacking brings them great joy and almost the same number (67%) added snacking is one of their favorite forms of stress relief. Six in 10 believe snacks taste better when they’re paired together; leading researchers to delve into some of the popular flavor combinations.

Cookies and cream comes out as the favorite snack pairing (39%), with chocolate and nuts following closely behind (37%). Popcorn and chocolate (35%), chocolate and marshmallows (34%), and chocolate and fruit (33%) round out the top five.

“Creating different combinations and experimenting with flavors can bring snacks to the next level, whether you’re indulging on your own or sharing with loved ones,” O’Brien says.